International Development News
Development News Edition

Effect of extreme climatic conditions on yield of staple crops calculated by researchers


Effect of extreme climatic conditions on yield of staple crops calculated by researchers
Overall, year-to-year changes in climate factors during the growing season of maize, rice, soy and spring wheat accounted for 20 per cent-49 per cent of yield fluctuations, according to research published in Environmental Research Letters. Image Credit: Pixabay

Researchers have calculated the effect of extreme climatic conditions such as drought or heat waves on the yield of staple crops worldwide. Overall, year-to-year changes in climate factors during the growing season of maize, rice, soy and spring wheat accounted for 20 per cent-49 per cent of yield fluctuations, according to research published in Environmental Research Letters.

Climate extremes, such as hot and cold temperature extremes, drought and heavy precipitation, by themselves, accounted for 18 per cent-43 per cent of these interannual variations in crop yield. To get to the bottom of the impacts of climate extremes on agricultural yields, the researchers used a global agricultural database at the high spatial resolution and near-global coverage climate and climate extremes datasets. They applied a machine-learning algorithm, Random Forests, to tease out which climate factors played the greatest role in influencing crop yields.

"Interestingly, we found that the most important climate factors for yield anomalies were related to temperature, not precipitation, as one could expect, with the average growing season temperature and temperature extremes playing a dominant role in predicting crop yields," said lead author Dr Elisabeth Vogel. The research also revealed global hotspots - areas that produce a large proportion of the world's crop production, yet are most susceptible to climate variability and extremes.

"We found that most of these hotspots - regions that are critical for overall production and at the same time strongly influenced by climate variability and climate extremes - appear to be in industrialised crop production regions, such as North America and Europe," Vogel added. For climate extremes specifically, the researchers identified North America for soy and spring wheat production, Europe for spring wheat and Asia for rice and maize production as hotspots.

But, as the researchers pointed out, global markets are not the only concern. Outside of these major regions, in regions where communities are highly dependent on agriculture for their livelihoods, the failure of these staple crops can be devastating. "In our study, we found that maize yields in Africa showed one of the strongest relationships with growing season climate variability. In fact, it was the second highest explained variance for crop yields of any crop/continent combination, suggesting that it is highly dependent on climate conditions," Vogel said.

"While Africa's share of global maize production may be small, the largest part of that production goes to human consumption - compared to just 3 per cent in North America - making it critical for food security in the region." "With climate change predicted to change the variability of climate and increasing the likelihood and severity of climate extremes in most regions, our research highlights the importance of adapting food production to these changes," Vogel said.

"Increasing the resilience to climate extremes requires a concerted effort at local, regional and international levels to reduce negative impacts for farmers and communities depending on agriculture for their living," Vogel added. (ANI)

(With inputs from agencies.)


TRENDING

OPINION/BLOG/INTERVIEW

'No escape from telephones', this 1953 prediction actually comes true

In 1953, a telephone company chief predicted that therell be no escape from telephones in the future....

With Ayodhya verdict, CJI starts clearing high profile pending cases

Ending all the speculations, the Chief Justice of India Mr. Ranjan Gogoi who is due to retire on November 17 decided to deliver the verdict in Ayodya dispute at 10.30 am on Saturday which is not a working day for the Supreme Court. This is ...

How partnerships and collaborations could enhance teacher training

Monica Malhotra Kandhari, Managing Director, MBD Group shares her views on public private partnership and collaborations in education sector. She supports her propositions with her organisations success stories....

Fixed Test centers would facelift level of WTC in India

The venues for the test matches in India should be fixed so that World Test Championship matches remain fair....

Videos

Latest News

Four arrested for robbing man of Rs 2,90,000 in Delhi's Sarai Kale Khan

Four men were arrested for allegedly attacking and robbing a man of Rs 2.9 lakh at southeast Delhis Sarai Kale Khan, police said on Thursday. Surender Agarwal, a wholesale dealer and owner of a grocery shop in Nagli Razapur area, was stoppe...

In swipe at US, BRICS hit out at protectionism

Five of the biggest emerging economies railed against protectionism on Thursday as they vowed to overcome significant challenges facing multilateralism, in a swipe at US tariffs and unilateral action. In a joint declaration, BRICS countries...

N.Macedonian PM says disappointed by EU but still committed

North Macedonia is disappointed by the failure of the European Union to open accession talks, Prime Minister Zoran Zaev said on Thursday, but his country was still committed to joining the bloc. French President Emmanuel Macron led a small ...

US STOCKS-Cisco's dour outlook weighs on Wall Street

U.S. stocks dipped on Thursday, weighed down by technology shares after Ciscos weak forecast raised worries of a slowdown in global economic growth, overshadowing strong results from big box retailer Walmart.The pullback in the benchmark SP...

Give Feedback